US Petition to Make Unlocking Cell Phones Legal Hits its 100k Goal!

This is a discussion on US Petition to Make Unlocking Cell Phones Legal Hits its 100k Goal! within the Android News forums, part of the Android.net category; A few weeks ago we shared that as of January 26th it is now illegal to unlock your carrier-contracted cell phone in the United States ...

Results 1 to 3 of 3
Like Tree2Likes
  • 2 Post By dgstorm

Thread: US Petition to Make Unlocking Cell Phones Legal Hits its 100k Goal!

  1. #1
    Editor in Chief dgstorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    4,720
    Thanked
    711 times

    US Petition to Make Unlocking Cell Phones Legal Hits its 100k Goal!


    A few weeks ago we shared that as of January 26th it is now illegal to unlock your carrier-contracted cell phone in the United States. Needless to say this was a pretty big topic that had many of us up in arms. Since then, an official petition went up online that aims to get the White House to take a look at making it legal again. For a number of reasons we elected not to officially post a follow-up news story on the front page, but instead let our members post this petition in the member news section and in the original thread discussion in the link above. Sometimes it's best to let our members run with the ball, rather than appear to take a particular stand one way or the other. This is despite the fact that most of us here at HQ are excited by the possibilities the petition represents.

    Regardless, we felt compelled to share some good news with you today on this subject. Checking out the official petition site, here, shows that we have reached the 100,000 mark goal! This was the first goal necessary to get the White House to take a look at the petition and review the topic further. Of course, there is still a long way to go before the law can be changed or overturned, but the first big hurdle is now behind us.

    If you are curious about this topic further, we have some interesting links to share with you regarding the topic. The first one below is a true story about a college student who first bumped into this law and gives a bit of history and perspective on the subject. It's a quick easy read and definitely worth your time. The second and third are simply links to some of our previous posts on the subject. You may be able to glean some further info from reading folks comments. The final link is the Petition itself. It's interesting to note that several websites covered this topic after we shared our original unlock story (although we don't claim to be the first).

    Here are those links:

    Motorola Tried to Sue Me For Unlocking Phones | Sina.is

    Just FYI: Saturday Jan 26th It Will Be Illegal in the US to Unlock Your Phone

    White House petition started to combat phone unlock law

    https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/pet...legal/1g9KhZG7

    It will probably be a long fight before anything gets changed, but at least the ball is rolling now! As always, please keep the politically polarizing comments out of the discussion. Please stay on the topic at hand and keep things civil. Thanks guys!
    wicked and Tears_for_Fears like this.

  2. Android.net is the premier Android Forum. Registered users do not see these ads. .

  3. #2
    Android Lurker crazygal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    4
    got a good response today from the white house about legalizing cell phone unlocking. here is the source:

    White House responds to petition: unlocking phones should be legalized

    The recent ruling that effectively bans third-party unlockinghas ruffled more than a few feathers, and the people have spoken with their electronic signatures---114,322 of them, to be exact. Now the petition to the White House, which asks that DMCA protection of phone unlockers be reconsidered, has finally received an official response, and it appears that it's for the positive. The author of the letter is R. David Edelman, Senior Advisor for Internet, Innovation and Privacy.
    "The White House agrees with the 114,000+ of you who believe that consumers should be able to unlock their cell phones without risking criminal or other penalties," Edelman writes. All told, the response matches that of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), which wrote a letter to the Librarian of Congress in support of extending the exemption last year.
    So what does this mean for us? Edelman states: "The Obama Administration would support a range of approaches to addressing this issue, including narrow legislative fixes in the telecommunications space that make it clear: neither criminal law nor technological locks should prevent consumers from switching carriers when they are no longer bound by a service agreement or other obligation." We're not going to see immediate change, but it appears that a chain of events is now in motion in which the FCC and Congress potentially play a huge role. We're not out of the woods yet, but it's relieving to see such a positive response -- along with a call to action -- from the government.


    what do you guys think?

    here is the full response letter:

    Thank you for sharing your views on cell phone unlocking with us through your petition on our We the People platform. Last week the White House brought together experts from across government who work on telecommunications, technology, and copyright policy, and we're pleased to offer our response.
    The White House agrees with the 114,000+ of you who believe that consumers should be able to unlock their cell phones without risking criminal or other penalties. In fact, we believe the same principle should also apply to tablets, which are increasingly similar to smart phones. And if you have paid for your mobile device, and aren't bound by a service agreement or other obligation, you should be able to use it on another network. It's common sense, crucial for protecting consumer choice, and important for ensuring we continue to have the vibrant, competitive wireless market that delivers innovative products and solid service to meet consumers' needs.
    This is particularly important for secondhand or other mobile devices that you might buy or receive as a gift, and want to activate on the wireless network that meets your needs -- even if it isn't the one on which the device was first activated. All consumers deserve that flexibility.
    The White House's position detailed in this response builds on some critical thinking done by the President's chief advisory Agency on these matters: the Department of Commerce's National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). For more context and information on the technical aspects of the issue, you can review the NTIA's letter to the Library of Congress' Register of Copyrights (.pdf), voicing strong support for maintaining the previous exception to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) for cell phone carrier unlocking.
    Contrary to the NTIA's recommendation, the Librarian of Congress ruled that phones purchased after January of this year would no longer be exempted from the DMCA. The law gives the Librarian the authority to establish or eliminate exceptions -- and we respect that process. But it is also worth noting the statement the Library of Congress released today on the broader public policy concerns of the issue. Clearly the White House and Library of Congress agree that the DMCA exception process is a rigid and imperfect fit for this telecommunications issue, and we want to ensure this particular challenge for mobile competition is solved.
    So where do we go from here?
    The Obama Administration would support a range of approaches to addressing this issue, including narrow legislative fixes in the telecommunications space that make it clear: neither criminal law nor technological locks should prevent consumers from switching carriers when they are no longer bound by a service agreement or other obligation.
    We also believe the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), with its responsibility for promoting mobile competition and innovation, has an important role to play here. FCC Chairman Genachowski today voiced his concern about mobile phone unlocking (.pdf), and to complement his efforts, NTIA will be formally engaging with the FCC as it addresses this urgent issue.
    Finally, we would encourage mobile providers to consider what steps they as businesses can take to ensure that their customers can fully reap the benefits and features they expect when purchasing their devices.
    We look forward to continuing to work with Congress, the wireless and mobile phone industries, and most importantly you -- the everyday consumers who stand to benefit from this greater flexibility -- to ensure our laws keep pace with changing technology, protect the economic competitiveness that has led to such innovation in this space, and offer consumers the flexibility and freedoms they deserve.
    Last edited by Tears_for_Fears; 03-08-2013 at 07:06 AM.

  4. #3
    Android Junkie Tears_for_Fears's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    You know that little planet in Solar System? The one with lots of water in it? Yeah, that's the one!
    Posts
    1,277
    Thanked
    230 times

    Re: US Petition to Make Unlocking Cell Phones Legal Hits its 100k Goal!

    Welcome to the forum, crazygal!
    Tears for Fears
    Warning! All outlaws will be shot! Survivors will be shot again!

    ~~~ Guidelines of Conduct ~~~
    The rest of you, have a nice day.


Remove Ads

http://www.scramblerducati.org/

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-08-2013, 06:05 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-15-2012, 03:33 PM
  3. Free Ringtones for Cell Phones
    By Maggi in forum LG Ally
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-06-2010, 11:29 AM
  4. Now legal to root our phones?
    By Big Bitch in forum Motorola Backflip
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 07-27-2010, 03:51 PM
Android Forum