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johnlnel
06-16-2011, 10:35 PM
I have both a BB Style (for business email) and a Nexus S for all other purposes. I get only one bar on my Nexus S in the same location and same time that I get five bars on my BB. This is the same location where I always got 4-5 bars on my old BB Curve. Does anyone know if other owners have experienced the same problem with the Nexus S? Any solutions?

hazzazi
06-22-2011, 11:42 AM
it might be a problem between 3G and edge, and some places i get only 1 bar on 3G, but when i switch to edge, i get full bars and calls don't drop either... look for an app to switch back n forth (i hope that helps)

johnlnel
06-22-2011, 09:34 PM
What is edge? I have a similar problem with reception.

Beer Goggles
06-23-2011, 12:41 AM
What is edge? I have a similar problem with reception.

EDGE is a 2.5G network

https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Enhanced_Data_Rates_for_GSM_Evolution

johnlnel
06-23-2011, 07:52 AM
I read the Wickipedia link you sent. Respectfully, it seems counter-productive to take the advanced technology offered in the Nexus S back a decade or so. This must be s Samsung design issue?!

danger-rat
06-23-2011, 09:02 AM
Most cell phone companies have a long standing Edge infrastructure, with 3G and 4G only added more recently. The 3G and 4G only partially cover the network. If cell phones don't include Edge, they don't get to full coverage of the network.

Beer Goggles
06-23-2011, 11:33 AM
I read the Wickipedia link you sent. Respectfully, it seems counter-productive to take the advanced technology offered in the Nexus S back a decade or so. This must be s Samsung design issue?!

I was just answering your question.

Most cellular networks are hybrid networks consisting of more than one type of transmission medium. In my case, with AT&T there are at least 4 different types of towers: GPRS (2G), EDGE (2.5G), 3G and 4G.

Not all areas have all types of coverage. Some areas get upgraded from older technologies to newer ones.

Most multi-network phones try to keep you connected to the best (i.e., fastest) network. When and how they switch is black magic. On some phones (N1), you can force it to always stay on 3G. But this also means that you might go completely out of service when you could have possibly been able to drop to 2G and still get coverage.

Some people also like to force the phone to use only 2G to save power.