Attempt at a product review

This is a discussion on Attempt at a product review within the LG Ally forums, part of the LG Android Phones category; This is my first time trying to review a product that I have no experience with. Also being a message board I will try to ...

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Thread: Attempt at a product review

  1. #1
    Android Lurker Wickerman's Avatar
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    This is my first time trying to review a product that I have no experience with. Also being a message board I will try to be a bit more informal and to the point both for the ease of the reader and making it simpler to type out.



    My phone finally shipped and I picked it up. First step to me was drop it off to the IT department, they set up my voice mail synced my contacts and a google voice account. It was also put into a rubber case that was not included in the box. I couldn't picture this phone not in a case such as this. I do not know the brand or anything but it feels like a well made product and would suggest everyone use one. Also a 3 count screen protector was applied (with 2 spares in my desk).



    I fired the phone back up on my own with plans to learn it as I read through the books that came with it, first off the books are half spanish, I don't mind other languages being used as I speak 3 myself but in this case they put so much time and room into another language to keep the book small and fit they cut out a lot of useful info. So unless you already have a grasp on phone usage you'd be hopeless. Due to this I found out the hard way my phone doesn't bounce well. It took no damage but just a quick fact on it's poor bouncing capabilities.



    I struggled with it for quite a while before even able to use the simplest functions. This is not a "my first cell phone". As I worried I do struggle greatly with the touch screen, and being forced to flip it and use the tiny keyboard is rather annoying. I can't say how this would be to someone used to that or not suffering hand problems as I do. So I'll not fault the phone for my own injuries.



    The fact you can not remove anything from it to start is greatly upsetting I've opened the wrong program countless times. I feel the only option to make this even remotely usable to me would be rooting. If your hands were more deft in movement then mine you might be ok, but still it's just a stupid hassle to have that stuff on it. BIG points off for that, I do not like any product that "leases" it self to the owner. I will have someone root it for me both for use and principle of the matter.



    The syncing factor of this phone was great. I personally use an OS-X system and a XP computer. Work we have windows 7 only. I had no problem with the contacts jumping all on from each computer and grouping and keeping all the data. I'm fully impressed with this. To be fair the clicking IT did but I watched it happen and had it taught to me, if I am to replace a computer I feel I could do it myself with no problems. No matter the operating system. Even the ease of the Blackberry's system was a nightmare in comparison.



    Verizon has well known shoddy reception in this area. So it's hard for me to judge things like quality of calls and 3g web speed. Next time I travel I will update assuming VWZ has good reception around there.



    I'm still struggling with a lot of the features and do not like how many things were made "cool" over functional. Now, I've not mastered it yet so I might be able to change things (and rooting should help) but I will say to set a phone like this from default was stupid. Flare is not how one should sell a product. It's like selling a car with 600 horse power but no brakes. Worthless. I struggle to pick up a call, due to the sliding my finger over the keypad to take a call vs a button like anything else i've used. (Or better yet picking up a hand set) I feel even if this can be fixed it should lose points for coming out of the box like that. It's a hassle, it might be "cool" but cool doesn't make it easy or useful. It feels like the baggy jeans of phones with features like that.



    Speed things happen is more then enough, maybe my expectations are low but I see no problem with how quickly this phone reacts.



    So over all, it seems like a decent device, it just is built to be flashy problem is it seems to give up some ease of use for this. For many that would be a deal killer, had I had a choice on replacement phones this would have broken a deal for me.



    I will also be making a post when I can write a bit more about what I'd like to change and the possibilities, if those matters could be sorted I could see the phone being a lot easier to live with and more useful to it's end user no matter the use.



    Regards,

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  3. #2
    Android Sr Member blackmetalbuick's Avatar
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    Unfortunately, having problems with your hands is definitely going to lower the enjoyment you get out of a device like this. The touchscreen is the main interface, and even sliding out the keyboard for most of your inputs doesn't really make things any better.



    I don't agree with your analogy of a car with 600hp and no brakes. The Ally is a pretty mild midrange phone. There are much flashier, higher powered phones out there. One thing you have to remember is the Android system is pretty much the same from phone to phone, so "the Ally" is not doing anything all that unique. These days you can get a bunch of different phones with different hardware, different cameras, bigger/smaller screens, etc, but the Android system is the Android system. If you don't like much of the way the phone operates, your issue is with Google's Android system. LG just chose to release this as an Android phone.



    It takes time to learn this phone, no matter who you are. I'm a pretty technical person, grew up with videogames and computers and internet, and it still took me a while to get used to my first smart phone. If I had written a review within the first day or two of owning my Ally, I probably would have hated it too.



    I can put it this simply: I was disappointed my first few days with the Ally. I thought I had made a mistake in upgrading my phone, I didn't think it was that great, even the physical keyboard (Which was my main reason for wanting this phone) didn't seem that great. But after giving it some time, I love it. There is definitely a learning curve and after that you'll be happier.



    They don't include full user manuals anymore, I guess to try to save paper. You can find a 300+ page guide online in PDF form. It's here on the forums but I can't find the link right now, just google search Verizon LG Ally User Guide.



    Rooting the phone will allow you to delete some of the preloaded programs, but they aren't really causing any harm just sitting in the App folder. I understand the principle of not being able to choose what you want on your phone is a bit insulting, so have someone root your phone if you wish, but it doesn't really make much difference.



    If I remember correctly, you were the forum member who said they were getting the Ally through work, and didn't really need any of the features, didn't need to make your own calls or emails during the day, and you were going to miss your Blackberry. Well, I've seen a handful of forum members here who have similar issues, and the bottom line is that the Ally, and Android phones in general, really aren't meant for people who aren't interested in using much of the functionality. A more proper analogy is getting a car with 600hp if you never intend to drive faster than 25mph. This phone can do a lot, and if you don't plan to use most of it, then yeah, the apps are just going to get in your way, and you'll find yourself clicking on the wrong icons, etc.



    I think you probably would have been happier with a different device, but the Ally definitely grows on most people over time.
    LG Ally - SW V 8 - Rooted - Velocity 0.3

  4. #3
    Android Enthusiast Jump's Avatar
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    BMB,...cranky,..err,..none, good discussion. BMB is right about the O S being about the same. Coming from a BlackBerry or iphone,.. it is a lot different, but you or another Ally user could pick up a Motorola with Android, boot it up and think, hey, I know how to do this. Like mentioned, you can root the phone, but understand what you're doing, and that you do it at your own peril. It's like replacing the pistons in your 600 HP car. You could realize a slight performance increase, but you could screw things up if it's not done right.

    By the way, many racing boats have 600 HP, and no brakes

  5. #4
    Android Lurker Wickerman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackmetalbuick View Post
    Unfortunately, having problems with your hands is definitely going to lower the enjoyment you get out of a device like this. The touchscreen is the main interface, and even sliding out the keyboard for most of your inputs doesn't really make things any better.



    I don't agree with your analogy of a car with 600hp and no brakes. The Ally is a pretty mild midrange phone. There are much flashier, higher powered phones out there. One thing you have to remember is the Android system is pretty much the same from phone to phone, so "the Ally" is not doing anything all that unique. These days you can get a bunch of different phones with different hardware, different cameras, bigger/smaller screens, etc, but the Android system is the Android system. If you don't like much of the way the phone operates, your issue is with Google's Android system. LG just chose to release this as an Android phone.



    It takes time to learn this phone, no matter who you are. I'm a pretty technical person, grew up with videogames and computers and internet, and it still took me a while to get used to my first smart phone. If I had written a review within the first day or two of owning my Ally, I probably would have hated it too.



    I can put it this simply: I was disappointed my first few days with the Ally. I thought I had made a mistake in upgrading my phone, I didn't think it was that great, even the physical keyboard (Which was my main reason for wanting this phone) didn't seem that great. But after giving it some time, I love it. There is definitely a learning curve and after that you'll be happier.



    They don't include full user manuals anymore, I guess to try to save paper. You can find a 300+ page guide online in PDF form. It's here on the forums but I can't find the link right now, just google search Verizon LG Ally User Guide.



    Rooting the phone will allow you to delete some of the preloaded programs, but they aren't really causing any harm just sitting in the App folder. I understand the principle of not being able to choose what you want on your phone is a bit insulting, so have someone root your phone if you wish, but it doesn't really make much difference.



    If I remember correctly, you were the forum member who said they were getting the Ally through work, and didn't really need any of the features, didn't need to make your own calls or emails during the day, and you were going to miss your Blackberry. Well, I've seen a handful of forum members here who have similar issues, and the bottom line is that the Ally, and Android phones in general, really aren't meant for people who aren't interested in using much of the functionality. A more proper analogy is getting a car with 600hp if you never intend to drive faster than 25mph. This phone can do a lot, and if you don't plan to use most of it, then yeah, the apps are just going to get in your way, and you'll find yourself clicking on the wrong icons, etc.



    I think you probably would have been happier with a different device, but the Ally definitely grows on most people over time.
    There are more tricky and powerful phones, that both impresses and scares me.



    So I'm more suffering with the program it runs then the tool it self. Thank you for clearing it up. I mean that with no sarcasm, I am not good with this stuff. Hence I tried to grain of salt my post with saying I have no experience with this product or market.



    I hope I can grow to find use and amusement out of it. It'll take time to know, and time I have so we'll see soon.



    Awesome thank you about the PDF, I feel that and a nice glass of scotch would be a helpful night figuring this thing out.



    I figured rooting will be handled by a pro and it might help with opening facebook (that I don't use) for the 43rd time as I try to check my emails. It can't make it worse (aside if the root goes bad but I don't see a pro messing it up).



    Yes, I am the one who work provided it to replace my blackberry. So the phone isn't a perfect fit and I wouldn't go as far as I miss or liked my blackberry it's just I liked the bloomberg app and keyboard also I was already used to it by the time I joined this site.



    I will give this thing more time I have given into some fun (baseball score tracking and stock tickers). But other then that I don't see what I'd personally want.



    Quote Originally Posted by Minty View Post
    BMB,...cranky,..err,..none, good discussion. BMB is right about the O S being about the same. Coming from a BlackBerry or iphone,.. it is a lot different, but you or another Ally user could pick up a Motorola with Android, boot it up and think, hey, I know how to do this. Like mentioned, you can root the phone, but understand what you're doing, and that you do it at your own peril. It's like replacing the pistons in your 600 HP car. You could realize a slight performance increase, but you could screw things up if it's not done right.

    By the way, many racing boats have 600 HP, and no brakes
    I know my way around cars, phones not so much so I'm letting someone else deal with that. I can't even figure how to check my voice mail do you think I want to open a terminal on this thing



    Again, I want to thank everyone for helping me learn this phone, sort out my misunderstandings and being beyond tolerant and patient with me!








  6. #5
    Android Jr Member Venez68's Avatar
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    Don't fear the technology; embrace it!

    Exploring these devices and figuring things out on your own is half the fun of owning them!
    "STAY THIRSTY MY FRIENDS"

  7. #6
    Android Sr Member jcsallyuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackmetalbuick View Post
    I can put it this simply: I was disappointed my first few days with the Ally. I thought I had made a mistake in upgrading my phone, I didn't think it was that great, even the physical keyboard (Which was my main reason for wanting this phone) didn't seem that great. But after giving it some time, I love it. There is definitely a learning curve and after that you'll be happier.


    BMB, I couldn't agree more with this statement, especially about the physical keyboard. It's a disappointment coming from the LG enV Touch, which had an amazing physical keyboard -- much easier to use that the Ally's -- and yet, a main selling point for the Ally.



    However, I'm getting used to the physical keyboard, and, overall, am enjoying my Ally very much. I'm convinced it's the best value in Verizon's current Android lineup.



    In reply to the original poster, I would urge you to not root your phone. I wouldn't believe anyone who says he or she is a "pro" at rooting. Odds are, the only phone they've ever rooted is their own, and even if they were successful, that makes them just lucky, but it doesn't make them a pro.



    Also, rooting will probably void the warranty, and since it's a company phone, I would expect you would be liable to your employer for anything bad that happened as a result of rooting.



    And finally, while I agree that buying a phone without having full administrative rights is insulting, there is an easy fix to your problem, if I understand it correctly. You can strip unwanted app icons from the home screens, and that can help with the clutter. Just touch and hold the icon and then drag it into the trash-can icon that will appear at the bottom of the screen. While it doesn't remove the unwanted app from your phone, it does put it out of sight and hopefully out of mind.

  8. #7
    Android Lurker bepineurope's Avatar
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    By the way... In case you haven't found out by now, you do not need to slide the screen in order to answer calls... Simply press the left-most hard button next to the home key.

  9. #8
    Android Sr Member Vol4One's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John23ally View Post
    Also, rooting will probably void the warranty, and since it's a company phone, I would expect you would be liable to your employer for anything bad that happened as a result of rooting.


    If you root the phone and then do a factory reset, doesn't that remove the root and make the phone exactly the way it was when you received it?

  10. #9
    Android Enthusiast Jump's Avatar
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    Hi Vol4one, rooting does void the warranty. Verizon will not replace it. I would suggest anyone without the expertise required and a thorough understanding of the O S just forget about it.

    This activity, and many others are considered hacking. I'm sure you can imagine why it got that nickname.



    And to answer your question, No, not really. Our friend, (and one of the big boys) BMB has already thought of this topic,... http://www.lgallyfor...a-rooted-phone/

  11. #10
    Android Sr Member Vol4One's Avatar
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    Thanks Minty for the reply. I wasn't sure how that worked.



    I haven't rooted my phone mainly because the pros don't outweigh the cons for me. Sure, I'd like to remove a few of the applications but they aren't causing me problems. The only other reason I would want to root my phone would be the tethering capability but I don't have a laptop anymore so even that means nothing to me. Plus, Froyo is supposed to have that capability (I think) if I need it. And, hopefully, we will be getting Froyo.

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