Now legal to root our phones?

This is a discussion on Now legal to root our phones? within the Motorola Backflip forums, part of the Motorola Android Phones category; Hey everyone, not too sure how much you all follow up on recent news. Especially news that regards copyrights and other patent/copyright protection laws out ...

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Thread: Now legal to root our phones?

  1. #1
    Junior Member Big Bitch's Avatar
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    Now legal to root our phones?

    Hey everyone, not too sure how much you all follow up on recent news. Especially news that regards copyrights and other patent/copyright protection laws out there.
    But as of today, according to the US Copyright office, it has been granted that it's legal to jailbreak iPhones and other handsets (I assume they mean root in our books here...)

    Here is the article by the EFF (Electronic Frontier Foundation),Here
    And the rule by the USCO, Here

    So what does this mean for us? For what I understand, this should just mean root access or atleast installing from outside sources. I am unsure if this means access to the bootloader. However, as Android is an open source application, I can't see why we can't have access over the ROM either.

    Victorious day for us?

    (Sorry about low post count, I mainly lurk here. I thought you guys would be rather interested in this subject)

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Joe Coolcool's Avatar
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    People that knew about rooting and the advantages of it would do it if it were legal or not.

    And low post count isn't a problem.
    Credit goes to ee0r.com for my avatar.

  4. #3
    Senior Member Zarathustra's Avatar
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    This is probably good news for the mod community in general, but it's meaningless if a phone is basically incapable of being rooted, like the Backflip. It's not like Motorola will now offer up the private keys we need to get root access.

  5. #4
    Senior Member Joe Coolcool's Avatar
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    Though it would be nice of them.
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  6. #5
    Junior Member Big Bitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post
    This is probably good news for the mod community in general, but it's meaningless if a phone is basically incapable of being rooted, like the Backflip. It's not like Motorola will now offer up the private keys we need to get root access.
    Please correct me if I'm misundertsanding this ordeal, but wouldn't this require them to hand over the required information into rooting the phone?

    And I agree with joe, it would be rather nice for them to forfeit the keys. I would be completely satisfied with all this bloatware removed.

  7. #6
    Senior Member jmgib's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big ***** View Post
    Please correct me if I'm misundertsanding this ordeal, but wouldn't this require them to hand over the required information into rooting the phone?

    And I agree with joe, it would be rather nice for them to forfeit the keys. I would be completely satisfied with all this bloatware removed.
    No, IANL, but the ruling doesn't require them to hand over the keys. It just means that people who choose to jailbreak (or presumably root, in our case) aren't breaking the law.
    Avatar courtesy of Elliott C. 'Eeyore' Evans

  8. #7
    Member mcpweev's Avatar
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    I'd be afraid that companies like Apple and Motorola who like to have control would react to this by increasing their efforts to keep the hardware secure from tampering. The USCO just made it crystal clear that rooting (or jailbreaking) is legal, but the way they call it "circumvention of access restrictions" means they're acknowledging that the companies' efforts to make devices secure is still totally legal.
    Wouldn't it be nice if they made it a legal right for us to easily do whatever we like with a piece of tech we just dropped a pretty penny on?

    edited cause I didn't make sense

  9. #8
    Senior Member Joe Coolcool's Avatar
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    I would be nice. I mean we paid for the thing in the first place. We should be able to do whatever we want with it.
    Credit goes to ee0r.com for my avatar.

  10. #9
    Junior Member Big Bitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcpweev View Post
    I'd be afraid that companies like Apple and Motorola who like to have control would react to this by increasing their efforts to keep the hardware secure from tampering. The USCO just made it crystal clear that rooting (or jailbreaking) is legal, but the way they call it "circumvention of access restrictions" means they're acknowledging that the companies' efforts to make devices secure is still totally legal.
    Wouldn't it be nice if they made it a legal right for us to easily do whatever we like with a piece of tech we just dropped a pretty penny on?

    edited cause I didn't make sense
    Well that clarified a lot of my misunderstandings, and so did Joe's. It's still a shame that they can't still hand over the keys. Motorola will probably continue to put lockdown software on there to make it harder for us. And for very little reason.

    I always thought, Android was supposed to be an open sourced operating system. Why couldn't they keep the phone open as well? Blur becomes worthless when 3.0 is released, so why protect it?

  11. #10
    Member mcpweev's Avatar
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    I agree, Big B.
    We've got a great operating system, designed to be customized and added on to, but I feel like I got suckered into buying the backflip since motorola and AT&T blocked so much of what we have fun doing.
    As much as I hate to admit it, just because google puts the operating system out there doesn't mean that every company who uses it has to adhere to that same open source mentality. They don't have much reason to anyways, considering most android users won't ever get more advanced than loading apps off the market, and won't notice that Motorola and AT&T put any restrictions on the phone. We're definately a minority.

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