Do I need to run antivius app.

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Thread: Do I need to run antivius app.

  1. #1
    Senior Member coldfusionb's Avatar
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    Do I need to run antivius app.

    Do I need to run antivius on my nexus such as antivirus free or pro?
    One Nexus To Rule Them All!

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  3. #2
    mah
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    Since there aren't any ways of introducing a virus to Android, I would say the answer is no.

  4. #3
    Junior Member MyNexus's Avatar
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    Can a virus be introduced thru apps

    Quote Originally Posted by mah View Post
    Since there aren't any ways of introducing a virus to Android, I would say the answer is no.
    Hi,

    I was just wondering, if the virus can be introduced thru apps themselves, is that a possibility at all?

    Can not an attachment be opened from an email?
    I am newbie and I am trying to figure this out.

    Thanks,

  5. #4
    mah
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    Email attachments can be opened, but in Windows (for example), that attachment can cause some code (embedded within the attachment) to execute. A more simple example is someone sending you "picture.jpg.exe" hoping you'll think it's a picture, but it's really an executable. A more common email-delivered virus includes something that triggers your web browser (IE, likely) and exploits a bug in it, to execute offending code.

    In Android, these things are not possible. If a buggy email client (or web browser, etc.) were discovered in the phone, the extent of the damage that could be used to cause is fairly limited due to inherent platform security between applications. In Windows, any application can perform any task you are permitted to perform, but in Android there is no "you" with regards to application security... each application is its own entity.

    That covers protection against malicious code, but in order to be a virus code must be replicating (and not necessarily malicious otherwise). This would mean the virus must be able to infect other applications on your device (not possible due to the security within the system) and/or deliver itself to other devices. Delivery through email is not directly possible because an application cannot send email without the user at least hitting the send button. (The application can compose the email, and take action that allows you to hit send or to cancel it.) Delivery via SMS might be possible, but to be viable in the first place, the virus would need to somehow be delivered to an application that not only has an exploitable bug but also has SMS send permission... Android applications must have permission to do things that might affect the device or user account.

    All in all... eventually there might be a need for more directed virus protection in Android, but prior to that time, we would need an actual virus for Android. Until such a virus exists, there's nothing for a virus detector to actually scan for (and once one did exist, it'd be easier to update the buggy app that allowed malicious code to run, than to scan for the virus showing up).

  6. #5
    mah
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    Incidentally, Android Developers Blog: Exercising Our Remote Application Removal Feature describes how Google is able to remotely uninstall applications that were installed through the Market, and later discovered to be malicious in nature. If you install applications through 3rd party markets, direct via ADB, etc., then your app probably cannot be uninstalled in that manner.

  7. #6
    Junior Member MyNexus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mah View Post
    Email attachments can be opened, but in Windows (for example), that attachment can cause some code (embedded within the attachment) to execute. A more simple example is someone sending you "picture.jpg.exe" hoping you'll think it's a picture, but it's really an executable. A more common email-delivered virus includes something that triggers your web browser (IE, likely) and exploits a bug in it, to execute offending code.

    In Android, these things are not possible. If a buggy email client (or web browser, etc.) were discovered in the phone, the extent of the damage that could be used to cause is fairly limited due to inherent platform security between applications. In Windows, any application can perform any task you are permitted to perform, but in Android there is no "you" with regards to application security... each application is its own entity.

    That covers protection against malicious code, but in order to be a virus code must be replicating (and not necessarily malicious otherwise). This would mean the virus must be able to infect other applications on your device (not possible due to the security within the system) and/or deliver itself to other devices. Delivery through email is not directly possible because an application cannot send email without the user at least hitting the send button. (The application can compose the email, and take action that allows you to hit send or to cancel it.) Delivery via SMS might be possible, but to be viable in the first place, the virus would need to somehow be delivered to an application that not only has an exploitable bug but also has SMS send permission... Android applications must have permission to do things that might affect the device or user account.

    All in all... eventually there might be a need for more directed virus protection in Android, but prior to that time, we would need an actual virus for Android. Until such a virus exists, there's nothing for a virus detector to actually scan for (and once one did exist, it'd be easier to update the buggy app that allowed malicious code to run, than to scan for the virus showing up).
    Wow! That is a very nice explanation. Now I am more secure.

    Thanks!

  8. #7
    Senior Member coldfusionb's Avatar
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    That answered a lot thanks
    One Nexus To Rule Them All!

  9. #8
    Senior Member fiercefire's Avatar
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    As opposed to "antivirus" software, I would really like to see "screeners" for Android platforms. It's essentially the same concept, but rather than looking for harmful code it would monitor application's actions (ie. an app that downloads useless data from the net over and over, or one that sends out your personal info, or even something as simple as eating up battery life). Know products to cause adverse affects could then be linked to a database and blocked.

    Meh, someone take this idea and run with it please, and if you want I'll share my idea for unlimited reusable energy using ocean currents as well

  10. #9
    mah
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    I have Lookout installed, not for its scanning property, but it happens to "scan" everything you install... for the first time I installed something it told me was not safe: Theft Alert. The Theft Alert setup program includes permission to install another app -- required to maintain its stealth installation (the setup installs the real thing, after customizing it to your name). I suspect Lookout claims its unsafe merely due to the permission, without regard to anything else.

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