Any EPF21B builds managed to update to FRF85B?

This is a discussion on Any EPF21B builds managed to update to FRF85B? within the Nexus One forums, part of the Google Phones category; Hi Pavansachi, Thanks for the great thought, however, I think most of us have tried that, the problem lies with the Vodafone locked down and ...

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Thread: Any EPF21B builds managed to update to FRF85B?

  1. #31
    Junior Member itbloke's Avatar
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    RE: WiFi OTA update.

    Hi Pavansachi,

    Thanks for the great thought, however, I think most of us have tried that, the problem lies with the Vodafone locked down and numbered ROM, once I had got rid of it, everything upgraded OTA automatically, both through 3G and WiFi, as I explained previously once we had got rid of Vodafones EPF21B Rom FRF91 worked automatically OTA from FRF81B so this somewhat proves that it all comes down to Vodafone, anyway thanks for the great thought, it was well worth a try.

    Kind Regards Ashe.

  2. #32
    Android Lurker Floogle's Avatar
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    getting rid of epf21b rom

    Quote Originally Posted by itbloke View Post
    Hi Pavansachi,

    Thanks for the great thought, however, I think most of us have tried that, the problem lies with the Vodafone locked down and numbered ROM, once I had got rid of it, everything upgraded OTA automatically, both through 3G and WiFi, as I explained previously once we had got rid of Vodafones EPF21B Rom FRF91 worked automatically OTA from FRF81B so this somewhat proves that it all comes down to Vodafone, anyway thanks for the great thought, it was well worth a try.

    Kind Regards Ashe.
    Itbloke, as I understand it, you have to unlock the bootloader first right? No problems with that so far. But once I've unlocked it, do I just then try to apply the frf85 update? Or do I have to apply a different stock rom first? If so, could you kindly show us a link to the stock recovery rom?

    I'm going to manually update, but just want to make sure I understand what I'm doing if I'm going to invalidate the warranty.

  3. #33
    Junior Member Bzuuuuu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Floogle View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by itbloke View Post
    Hi Pavansachi,

    Thanks for the great thought, however, I think most of us have tried that, the problem lies with the Vodafone locked down and numbered ROM, once I had got rid of it, everything upgraded OTA automatically, both through 3G and WiFi, as I explained previously once we had got rid of Vodafones EPF21B Rom FRF91 worked automatically OTA from FRF81B so this somewhat proves that it all comes down to Vodafone, anyway thanks for the great thought, it was well worth a try.

    Kind Regards Ashe.
    Itbloke, as I understand it, you have to unlock the bootloader first right? No problems with that so far. But once I've unlocked it, do I just then try to apply the frf85 update? Or do I have to apply a different stock rom first? If so, could you kindly show us a link to the stock recovery rom?

    I'm going to manually update, but just want to make sure I understand what I'm doing if I'm going to invalidate the warranty.
    Apparently, you just need to apply a different stock recovery (other than the Euro ones) and then update directly using the official / global FRF85B update ?

  4. #34
    Android Lurker Floogle's Avatar
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    Okay, i've unlocked my bootloader (no going back now!) but i don't understand how to flash the ROM to a different stock. I am downloading ERD79 but i'm unsure how to apply it. i think you use fastboot, but i'm not clear on exactly how to use that either...

    Once i get past this hurdle, it should be plain sailing. Can anyone help me jump over it?

  5. #35
    Member T5Dave's Avatar
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    This news really isn't surprising from Vodafone - they did the same with the N95 when it was first released.

    The phone was slated as having VOIP functionality from Nokia, and direct from the manufacturer it did, but then Vodafone got their hands on it, "optimised" the firmware (basically filled it full of Vodafone Live stuff that no-one wanted) and silently took the VOIP functionality out, after all, if you were a telco - why would you let users use Fring or Truphone to make calls over WIFI that make you no money at all?

    You had to flash a default phone ID to the N95 which then let you use unbranded, euro firmwares (which had all the features in, and also enabled other features like memory page addressing (iirc) which sped up the phone no end). Carriers having their grubby mitts in the firmware game do phones no favours.

    Orange were the same with the 3230 back in the day. It was originally a great little Symbian phone, but the firmware was buggy as hell and you were prevented from installing non-orange sanctioned updates on it. Their frequency of update was a lot less than Nokia's, which meant that users who bought the phone were stuck with a buggy piece of crap for the duration of their contracts.

    Firmware fragmentation is really harming the mobile industry, and it's control freak networks that are the driving force behind it. If they let everyone use default firmwares, let the manufacturers deal with updates and looked after the carrier things rather than worrying about the phones, the whole experience would be better.

    The way the iPhone has the firmware distribution is like this, and it seems to be fine - you either hack it, or get your updates direct from apple, there is no carrier customisation and no functionality lost whether you buy your phone from LA, London or Lahore.

    If the carriers are worried about data saturation, then make sure that everyone is aware of limits, acceptable use policies and penalties rather than saying "unlimited this" with "500mb AUP" in very small letters. If people are aware of the penalties for abusing data - be that through hammering youtube/iplayer on the phone or hammering torrents via a tethered connection, they won't abuse them.

    Just my 2p's

  6. #36
    Junior Member Bzuuuuu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Floogle View Post
    Okay, i've unlocked my bootloader (no going back now!) but i don't understand how to flash the ROM to a different stock. I am downloading ERD79 but i'm unsure how to apply it. i think you use fastboot, but i'm not clear on exactly how to use that either...

    Once i get past this hurdle, it should be plain sailing. Can anyone help me jump over it?
    Should be pretty straightforward and you won't need to flash an entire stock US 2.1 ROM build before updating to 2.2, you just need to flash into your N1 a small file (2MB long) named recovery.img taken from one of those US builds (e.g. ERD79).

    The line-command fastboot is only used in the process to unlock the bootloader and to flash the new recovery image file (recovery.img). Please see below:

    1. Unlock the bootloader.
    DOS Command is: fastboot -windows oem unlock

    2. Flash a recovery image from a different stock build (e.g. ERD79)
    Filename is: recovery.img
    DOS Command is: fastboot flash recovery recovery.img

    3. Copy the file "signed-passion-ota-42745.dc39ca1f.zip" to the root of you SD card, and rename it to update.zip

    4
    . Power-off your Nexus One. Boot into fastboot by holding down the tracker ball and then pressing on the power button.

    5. Choose "BOOTLOADER" by pressing the power button. This should then show you a screen with *** UNLOCKED *** in the top left corner.

    6. Press Volume Down button, so you highlight "RECOVERY" and press the Power Button. You should seen the X logo with the unlocked padlock beneath, shortly followed by a triangle with an exclamation mark and a small green android to the bottom right.

    7. Now press at the same time Volume Up and Power Button. You should now be presented with the "Android system recovery <3e>" page

    8. First, do a "wipe cache partition", then do a "wipe data/factory reset".

    9. Finally: "apply sdcard:update.zip"... It will take a few minutes and will reboot a couple of times.

    10. Ta-daaaaaaaaaaa... FroYo 2.2 FRF85B! :D

  7. #37
    Junior Member Bzuuuuu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by T5Dave View Post
    This news really isn't surprising from Vodafone - they did the same with the N95 when it was first released.

    The phone was slated as having VOIP functionality from Nokia, and direct from the manufacturer it did, but then Vodafone got their hands on it, "optimised" the firmware (basically filled it full of Vodafone Live stuff that no-one wanted) and silently took the VOIP functionality out, after all, if you were a telco - why would you let users use Fring or Truphone to make calls over WIFI that make you no money at all?

    You had to flash a default phone ID to the N95 which then let you use unbranded, euro firmwares (which had all the features in, and also enabled other features like memory page addressing (iirc) which sped up the phone no end). Carriers having their grubby mitts in the firmware game do phones no favours.

    Orange were the same with the 3230 back in the day. It was originally a great little Symbian phone, but the firmware was buggy as hell and you were prevented from installing non-orange sanctioned updates on it. Their frequency of update was a lot less than Nokia's, which meant that users who bought the phone were stuck with a buggy piece of crap for the duration of their contracts.

    Firmware fragmentation is really harming the mobile industry, and it's control freak networks that are the driving force behind it. If they let everyone use default firmwares, let the manufacturers deal with updates and looked after the carrier things rather than worrying about the phones, the whole experience would be better.

    The way the iPhone has the firmware distribution is like this, and it seems to be fine - you either hack it, or get your updates direct from apple, there is no carrier customisation and no functionality lost whether you buy your phone from LA, London or Lahore.

    If the carriers are worried about data saturation, then make sure that everyone is aware of limits, acceptable use policies and penalties rather than saying "unlimited this" with "500mb AUP" in very small letters. If people are aware of the penalties for abusing data - be that through hammering youtube/iplayer on the phone or hammering torrents via a tethered connection, they won't abuse them.

    Just my 2p's
    Totally agree with your opinion. Spot on!

  8. #38
    Android Lurker Floogle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bzuuuuu View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Floogle View Post
    Okay, i've unlocked my bootloader (no going back now!) but i don't understand how to flash the ROM to a different stock. I am downloading ERD79 but i'm unsure how to apply it. i think you use fastboot, but i'm not clear on exactly how to use that either...

    Once i get past this hurdle, it should be plain sailing. Can anyone help me jump over it?
    Should be pretty straightforward and you won't need to flash an entire stock US 2.1 ROM build before updating to 2.2, you just need to flash into your N1 a small file (2MB long) named recovery.img taken from one of those US builds (e.g. ERD79).

    The line-command fastboot is only used in the process to unlock the bootloader and to flash the new recovery image file (recovery.img). Please see below:

    1. Unlock the bootloader.
    DOS Command is: fastboot -windows oem unlock

    2. Flash a recovery image from a different stock build (e.g. ERD79)
    Filename is: recovery.img
    DOS Command is: fastboot flash recovery recovery.img

    3. Copy the file "signed-passion-ota-42745.dc39ca1f.zip" to the root of you SD card, and rename it to update.zip

    4. Power-off your Nexus One. Boot into fastboot by holding down the tracker ball and then pressing on the power button.

    5. Choose "BOOTLOADER" by pressing the power button. This should then show you a screen with *** UNLOCKED *** in the top left corner.

    6. Press Volume Down button, so you highlight "RECOVERY" and press the Power Button. You should seen the X logo with the unlocked padlock beneath, shortly followed by a triangle with an exclamation mark and a small green android to the bottom right.

    7. Now press at the same time Volume Up and Power Button. You should now be presented with the "Android system recovery <3e>" page

    8. First, do a "wipe cache partition", then do a "wipe data/factory reset".

    9. Finally: "apply sdcard:update.zip"... It will take a few minutes and will reboot a couple of times.

    10. Ta-daaaaaaaaaaa... FroYo 2.2 FRF85B! :D

    Bzuuuuuuu, you're a star, thanks so much for this guide.

    If you can bear with me on this, can i ask about step 2? I downloaded the ERD79 stock recovery image, but where do i need to save it to on my hard drive? I tried saving it into my c drive for ease, then executed DOS command fastboot flash recovery recovery.img , but it just says that fastboot flash is not an executable command. This is with my Nexus connected to the computer, in the bootloader menu (fastboot usb). what am i missing here?

    Once i get past this bit, because of your guide it should be relatively painless...

    Thxs again for your excellent reply mate

  9. #39
    Android Lurker Floogle's Avatar
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    Bzuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu,

    Forget about last post, I finally figured out what I was doing wrong!

    FRF85 is on the way and installing as i type - WHooooooHooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Big, Big shout out to you for the awesome guide.

  10. #40
    Junior Member markjtnet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bzuuuuu View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by T5Dave View Post
    This news really isn't surprising from Vodafone - they did the same with the N95 when it was first released.

    The phone was slated as having VOIP functionality from Nokia, and direct from the manufacturer it did, but then Vodafone got their hands on it, "optimised" the firmware (basically filled it full of Vodafone Live stuff that no-one wanted) and silently took the VOIP functionality out, after all, if you were a telco - why would you let users use Fring or Truphone to make calls over WIFI that make you no money at all?

    You had to flash a default phone ID to the N95 which then let you use unbranded, euro firmwares (which had all the features in, and also enabled other features like memory page addressing (iirc) which sped up the phone no end). Carriers having their grubby mitts in the firmware game do phones no favours.

    Orange were the same with the 3230 back in the day. It was originally a great little Symbian phone, but the firmware was buggy as hell and you were prevented from installing non-orange sanctioned updates on it. Their frequency of update was a lot less than Nokia's, which meant that users who bought the phone were stuck with a buggy piece of crap for the duration of their contracts.

    Firmware fragmentation is really harming the mobile industry, and it's control freak networks that are the driving force behind it. If they let everyone use default firmwares, let the manufacturers deal with updates and looked after the carrier things rather than worrying about the phones, the whole experience would be better.

    The way the iPhone has the firmware distribution is like this, and it seems to be fine - you either hack it, or get your updates direct from apple, there is no carrier customisation and no functionality lost whether you buy your phone from LA, London or Lahore.

    If the carriers are worried about data saturation, then make sure that everyone is aware of limits, acceptable use policies and penalties rather than saying "unlimited this" with "500mb AUP" in very small letters. If people are aware of the penalties for abusing data - be that through hammering youtube/iplayer on the phone or hammering torrents via a tethered connection, they won't abuse them.

    Just my 2p's
    Totally agree with your opinion. Spot on!
    I've worked in the industry for 11 years and couldn't agree more. We get caught in the middle between manufacturers wanting the latest updates and the networks holding back on the firmware releases. Ultimately it's us as consumers who get the raw end of the deal.

    To give you and idea on what is to come it currently takes us 6 minutes to clear down and upgrade a Nokia X6. When using the Vodafone variant it takes nearly 15 minutes.

    Thanks Dave for convincing me to free my Nexus. Just updated to FRF91 and loving the difference!

    The comprehensive list of update.zip links - Android Help

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