Converting AT&T to T-Mobile

This is a discussion on Converting AT&T to T-Mobile within the Nexus One forums, part of the Google Phones category; Hi all, From what I've seen online, it seems like the Nexus One has a 3G chip that supports 1700MHz and 1900MHz but the antenna ...

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Thread: Converting AT&T to T-Mobile

  1. #1
    Junior Member ldiamond's Avatar
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    Converting AT&T to T-Mobile

    Hi all,
    From what I've seen online, it seems like the Nexus One has a 3G chip that supports 1700MHz and 1900MHz but the antenna is different for the T-Mobile version compared to AT&T.

    Has anyone attempted to convert a AT&T cellphone to T-Mobile by making the antenna longer (or changing it for a longer antenna) or convert a T-Mobile to AT&T by making the antenna shorter?

    Is there also software limitation (i.e. software looking at IMEI to initialize the 3G chip so that it listens only on the correct frequency)?

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  3. #2
    Android Lurker DudeRandom21's Avatar
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    Well I'm sure this is possible but I think it would be a little more complicated than what you make it sound if I were you I would just try and trade your at&t one for a t-mo one or what ever.

  4. #3
    Senior Member davidalow44's Avatar
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    The T-Mobile N1 supports the 1700 3G band and the 1900 2G band. AT&T uses the 1900 3G band. Your T-Mobile N1 doesn't have the right firmware, radio or antenna to get AT&T 3G.

    I wish it did, that would make it almost perfect.

  5. #4
    Senior Member dixy2k's Avatar
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    AT&T uses 850 MHz.
    In this case you should cut the T-Mobile antenna (1700 MHz) exactly in half therefore obtaining the right length for the AT&T signal.

  6. #5
    Senior Member deel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dixy2k View Post
    AT&T uses 850 MHz.
    In this case you should cut the T-Mobile antenna (1700 MHz) exactly in half therefore obtaining the right length for the AT&T signal.


    is this actually true? you can change frequencies of antennas by cutting them? that doesnt make sense to me

  7. #6
    Administrator WERA689's Avatar
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    Yeah, it is...it's related to wavelengths of the frequencies used...but I sure wouldn't try it on my N1!!!

  8. #7
    Junior Member Beer Goggles's Avatar
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    Lightbulb

    Google made two different phones for a reason.

  9. #8
    Administrator WERA689's Avatar
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    Precisely!

  10. #9
    Senior Member davidalow44's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deel View Post
    is this actually true? you can change frequencies of antennas by cutting them? that doesnt make sense to me
    To get the T-mobile N1 to use AT&T 3G, you would have to replace at least one major systems chip that deals with encoding and protocols, an RF amplifier, possibly an antenna (might be able to double up on the 1900 MHz 2G antenna), and some firmware. This is what they did to create the AT&T N1.

  11. #10
    Senior Member deel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidalow44 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by deel View Post
    is this actually true? you can change frequencies of antennas by cutting them? that doesnt make sense to me
    To get the T-mobile N1 to use AT&T 3G, you would have to replace at least one major systems chip that deals with encoding and protocols, an RF amplifier, possibly an antenna (might be able to double up on the 1900 MHz 2G antenna), and some firmware. This is what they did to create the AT&T N1.

    this makes sense. but just cutting an antenna in half to half the frequency sounds like a hack, so i was surprised that it would actually work.

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